Miljuschka’s wonderful watermelon salad

Miljuschka’s wonderful watermelon salad

by marlies|dekkers

This watermelon and coconut salad recipe by Dutch kitchen goddess Miljuschka instantly makes me feel like I am having lunch at a tropical beach. Close enough! And the best part? Making it takes only 15 minutes. Click here for the original recipe in Dutch, and give it a try. Bon appétit!

Shopping list:

    – Half a watermelon
    – 80g grated coconut
    – A few sprigs of fresh mint
    – 175g feta cheese
    – 100ml cream
    – 75g cream cheese
    1. Mix the cream, the cream cheese and 75 grams of the feta cheese together to create a nice and creamy substance.
    2. Use a melon baller to take bite-size pieces out of the watermelon. If you don’t have a melon baller, you can just cut the watermelon into cubes (or any bite-size shape you like, really. Feel free to get creative!).
    3. Toast the coconut in a hot baking pan.
    4. Time to plate! First, put the cream on the plate or in the bowl that you are using. Crumble half of the leftover feta cheese onto the cream, and top it with the toasted coconut. Finally, add the rest of the feta cheese and the watermelon and finish your salad with some fresh mint leaves.

That was easy, right? Enjoy your summery salad!

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